Tree Planting at Willow Waterhole Storm Water Detention Basin

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In an effort to keep you informed about the Harris County Flood Control District's continuing improvements in the Willow Waterhole watershed , we want to notify you of a project in your area.

During the 2016-17 tree planting season, which runs from October 2016 through March 2017, the Flood Control District planted approximately 4,445 native trees at Willow Waterhole Stormwater Detention Basin, formally identified as HCFCD Units D512-01-00, in southern Harris County.

Tree species include loblolly pine, bald cypress, pecan and others.

Along with beautifying and providing wildlife habitat along our bayous and stormwater detention basins, trees offer important structural and economic benefits that complement the Flood Control District's mission. Mature trees and their web of roots help reduce erosion in drainage channels. Tree canopies also reduce mowing costs, help keep channels clear of undesirable vegetation, and improve water quality by dispersing erosion-causing rainfall.

Tree placement must be carefully considered to avoid compromising flood controlfunctions .

Trees typically can be planted along the upper third of channel slopes, and in groups (or mottes) that mimic nature.These planting guidelines ensure clear flow within the channels and proper access for maintenance vehicles and workers, and allow for the multi-use of our bayous and basins for trails and recreation areas. Within larger stormwater detention basins,trees are planted in groups; in smaller basins, trees are planted throughout the site.

Since 2001,the Flood Control District's tree planting program has added more than 230,000 trees to more than 200 flood control sites in Harris County.The Flood Control District typically waters, mulches anc fertilizes newly planted trees for a two-year period while they establist­ their root systems.

How to Plant a Tree on District easements
Individuals and groups that wish to sponsor a tree-planting event on Flood Control District property or easements should start by contacting the Flood Control District Community Services Section at 713-684-4000,or by visiting http://www.hcfcd.org/trees.html.

While the Flood Control District does not organize tree-planting events, it may be able to provide trees or suggest planting plans and appropriate locations, typically on the banks of bayous, channels or stormwater detention basins.